DIY Aged Terracotta Planters

We have a pretty good amount of plants in our apartment. It's so good to have plants around and plants seem to do better when there are other plants around so that's how we've gotten where we are. The fact that I've gotten better at not killing every green thing that comes into the apartment might also have something to do with it. Rosemary is the exception. I cut myself off after the third poor, poor helpless rosemary plant I killed. If someone knows the secret to talking those things down - please leave a comment! 

Several pf these plants are living in glasses of water or the original, flimsy plant pot they were born in. I decided that these little things need a proper home. I found a small stack of terra-cotta pots hiding in a cupboard and decided to try to dress them up a bit. 

I know if you really want to distress a terra cotta pot, you make a paste of garden lime and water, paint it on the pot, let it dry and spray it with a sealer. I don't have garden lime or sealer. I also really didn't want to go all the way down to the garden store and then be married to an eight pound bag of garden lime that I would probably end up moving with. 

Oh, white acrylic paint. It solves so many problems for me: strangely colored picture frames, end tables I've gotten rid of, Branch jewelry holder DIY, spice jar tops, actual paintings... In this case, a simple squeeze of paint in a splash of water. They look great - a nice refresh from their original look. 

You can see from the photos that I did not clean my pots out from the last time I tossed whatever rosemary plant probably died in it. I also didn't clean them before I started painting. It was fine - what's a little dirt? 

Supplies: 

terra-cotta plant pots

white acrylic paint

water

paint brush

a cup for mixing 

paper for your work surface

How to:

Mix about 1/2 a teaspoon and 1 tablespoon of water in a cup.  I like to soak my brush in the paint mixture and cover the pot with it, sometimes adding just water or more extra paint to the brush and using that here and there. You don't want it to look uniform. You can always wash some of it off with water or add more paint to areas that need it. Play around with it. After the first one, you'll get the hang of what works for you. 

Let the pots dry before cleaning up as they change a lot from wet to dry. Once dry, add your plants.